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Issues

The St. Lawrence River is threatened by numerous problems. Read on to learn about a few key issues facing the St. Lawrence River ecosystem.

Invasive Species

Aquatic invasive species are one of the most critical problems facing the St. Lawrence River and Great Lakes. With 186 species introduced into the River and Lakes, the region's ecosystem is bending under the weight of these introduced species. Some scientists worry that the ecosystem of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River may be close to collapse because of these species.

To learn more about aquatic invasive species and Save The River's campaign to stop further introductions, visit our Clean Up the Ballast page.

Water Levels Regulation

With a massive hydropower dam blocking the River in the Massena/Cornwall region, water levels on the Upper St. Lawrence River are manually regulated. The management plan that has been in place for the past 50 years has caused significant damage to tens of thousands of acres of wetlands in the region.

To learn more about Save The River's campaign to restore more natural water levels on the River, visit our water levels page.

St. Lawrence Seaway

The St. Lawrence River is the only pathway for ships to enter the Great Lakes. Unfortunately, ships bring along a host of problems, from oils spills and accidents, to winter navigation damage, and constant threats to expand Seaway infrastructure. Save The River has been an advocate for more sustainable shipping on the River.

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To learn more about Save The River's shipping-related advocacy work, visit the following pages Spills/Accidents, Winter Navigation, Navigation Study, Clean Up the Ballast Campaign.

Latest News

Save The River to Army Corps, “Physically Separate the Great Lakes & Mississippi River”
Simply and directly put, Save The River feels that physical separation of the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River basin is the only permanent and sustainable method of preventing the epidemic of Bighead and Silver carp threatening the St. Lawrence River. read more

Seaway Opening Delayed to March 31.
Conditions still merit concern. read more

Respect the Conditions on the River, Delay the Seaway Opening
Save The River has long advocated a research-based list of criteria be used to set the shipping season on the St. Lawrence Seaway. But it really is simple. Get the ice out and the navigational aids in. Don’t send ships through until its safe for the River. read more

Save The River Urges State to Not Weaken Water Quality Monitoring
It has been dismaying to our 4,000 + members and supporters that the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has proposed significantly weakening the monitoring of New York’s waterbodies and, at the same time, restricting the sources of monitoring data that could complement and supplement a reduced state monitoring effort. Simply ignoring the myriad of pollutants that are impairing our waterbodies like the St. Lawrence River will not make them clean nor reduce the consequences to our children, our visitors and our state’s residents that will result from their unknowing exposure to those pollutants. read more

February 23-28 is National Invasive Species Awareness Week
Aquatic invasive species are one of the most critical problems facing the St. Lawrence River and Great Lakes. With 186 species introduced into the River and Lakes, the region's ecosystem is bending under the weight of these introduced species. Some scientists worry that the ecosystem of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River may be close to collapse because of these species. The damage done by invasive plants alone costs the U.S. an estimated $34.7 billion a year. read more

Long Awaited Report Released on How to Stop Asian Carp
The much anticipated Army Corps of Engineers' report identifying options to stop the spread of Asian Carp and other aquatic invasive species between the Great Lakes and Mississippi River waterways has been released. Now it is time for citizens from around the Great Lakes St. Lawrence River Basin to speak up and demand the most robust solution - physical separation. read more

Great Video, Saving the Sturgeon
Jonathan Bird travels to upstate New York to learn how biologists are working to save the sturgeon in the St. Lawrence river. During a dive he films an amazing spectacle that has never been recorded before! read more

THIS IS IT! Tell the IJC, “ACT NOW!”
It doesn't have to be lengthy or eloquent. It can be as simple as "I Support Plan 2014 and believe it should be implemented now." read more

See our blog for more news!     

Get in Touch

409 Riverside Drive
Clayton, NY 13624
p: (315) 686-2010
e: info@savetheriver.org

River Photos

Off to the races by Pam Quimby  Resting by Pam Quimby  On the Rocks by Nick Apel  Classic Sunset by Barb Hupp  TI Park Library by Meg Kerr  Fall by Carrie Kerr  Girls by Juliane Bauer  Winter Navigation by Sherman Ward 
 Pictures from our Flickr photostream

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