Issues

The St. Lawrence River is threatened by numerous problems. Read on to learn about a few key issues facing the St. Lawrence River ecosystem.

Invasive Species

Aquatic invasive species are one of the most critical problems facing the St. Lawrence River and Great Lakes. With 186 species introduced into the River and Lakes, the region's ecosystem is bending under the weight of these introduced species. Some scientists worry that the ecosystem of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River may be close to collapse because of these species.

To learn more about aquatic invasive species and Save The River's campaign to stop further introductions, visit our Clean Up the Ballast page.

Water Levels Regulation

With a massive hydropower dam blocking the River in the Massena/Cornwall region, water levels on the Upper St. Lawrence River are manually regulated. The management plan that has been in place for the past 50 years has caused significant damage to tens of thousands of acres of wetlands in the region.

To learn more about Save The River's campaign to restore more natural water levels on the River, visit our water levels page.

St. Lawrence Seaway

The St. Lawrence River is the only pathway for ships to enter the Great Lakes. Unfortunately, ships bring along a host of problems, from oils spills and accidents, to winter navigation damage, and constant threats to expand Seaway infrastructure. Save The River has been an advocate for more sustainable shipping on the River.

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To learn more about Save The River's shipping-related advocacy work, visit the following pages Spills/Accidents, Winter Navigation, Navigation Study, Clean Up the Ballast Campaign.

Latest News

Save The Date! Winter Environmental Conference is Coming.
Save The River's 28th Winter Environmental Conference is Saturday, February 4, 2017. read more

Vote!
. Vote as if your children and their children’s access to swimmable, drinkable, fishable water depends on it. . . Demand that our elected officials at every level work for a healthy St. Lawrence River that provides safe drinking water, is home to a thriving range of indigenous species and supports sustainable economic activity.   read more

Another Anniversary of the Clean Water Act; And Still No New Water Levels Plan!
For over 50 years the St. Lawrence River has suffered under a destructive water levels management plan. On this 44th anniversary of the Clean Water Act, almost 20 years after the destruction of over 64,000 acres of wetlands habitat and the precipitous decline of species dependent on those wetlands was identified and more than 2 years after a plan to begin the restoration of those wetlands was referred to them, the U.S. and Canadian federal governments still have not acted, and the St. Lawrence remains one of America's most endangered rivers. read more

Save The River Questions Oil on the River at Great Lakes Forum 2016
Crude oil has no place on the River or its tributaries. While at the Great Lakes Public Forum, Riverkeeper and Save The River's Executive Director had a chance to remind the panelists of the 1976 Nepco 140 spill of 300,000 gallons of crude oil on the St. Lawrence River - at the time the largest inland oil spill in North America and to ask about measures to deal with spills from pipelines, and rail, as well as ships. read more

Join Us
Join us in our work to protect, preserve and restore the St. Lawrence River now and for future generations. read more

Executive Director interviewed for Public Television on Water Levels
Taking every opportunity to make the case for our two federal governments to lift their pens and concur with the International Joint Commission’s Plan 2014 read more

More on the Documentary “Changing Currents: Protecting North America’s Rivers”
"I am honored, as Riverkeeper & Executive Director of Save The River, to be able to speak about the work we and many others have done to preserve, protect and restore the St. Lawrence River as part of what looks to be an excellent documentary about the threats to freshwater bodies across North America and some of the restoration efforts occurring in communities across the continent." read more

Wetlands need Cuomo’s support, from the Albany Times Union
When I listen again to the governor's words about the value of healthy wetlands, I remain inspired. Lake Ontario, the St. Lawrence River and the North Country deserve the same consideration as the New York City area. These wetlands must be restored, and Cuomo must take action now to support Plan 2014. - Lee Willbanks, Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper & Save The River Executive Director read more

Save The River Submits to Comments to Public Service Commission on Wind Projects
The implications of this study for the likely impacts on migratory birds and bats of the three industrial wind projects currently proposed and proceeding now, all of which are well within 10 miles of Lake Ontario or St. Lawrence River shoreline, must be taken into account by every level of government agency - from local municipal, to state and federal – with permitting or oversight authority. In particular the New York State Departments of Public Service and Environmental Conservation which have shared responsibility, under Article 10, for the permitting and siting of industrial wind projects, must exercise their statutory authority and require the developers of these three projects undertake a joint, credible effort to apply the findings of the Fish and Wildlife Service report to the impacts of their projects on migratory birds and bats. read more

Governor Cuomo on the Value of Healthy Wetlands
His comments have direct application to the damage an out-dated dam management plan has caused to Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River and the need for a modern, restorative water levels plan - Plan 2014. read more

See our blog for more news!     


About Us

Founded in 1978, Save The River is a non-profit, member-supported environmental organization whose mission is to restore, preserve and protect the ecological integrity of the Upper St. Lawrence River through advocacy, education and research. Since 2004 Save The River has been a member of the Waterkeeper Alliance as the Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper.

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The River

The St. Lawrence River is one of the largest Rivers in the world and a magnificent place to live, work and play. Save The River has been working for more than 35 years to protect the River for current and future generations.

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Join or Give

Over half of Save The River's budget comes from individual memberships and contributions. Supporting us with an annual membership donation will keep our River advocacy, education and research programs going strong.

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Save The River was designated the Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper and is a member of the international Waterkeeper Alliance. The Waterkeeper Alliance is the world’s fastest growing environmental movement, with more than 200 local Waterkeepers patrolling rivers, lakes and coastal waterways on 6 continents.


Photos from around the River

Off to the races by Pam Quimby  Resting by Pam Quimby  On the Rocks by Nick Apel  Classic Sunset by Barb Hupp  TI Park Library by Meg Kerr  Fall by Carrie Kerr  Girls by Juliane Bauer  Winter Navigation by Sherman Ward  Off on the River by Jenni Werndorf  A Seaway View by Devon Colby 
 Pictures from our Flickr photostream

409 Riverside Drive
Clayton, NY 13624

(315) 686-2010
info@savetheriver.org

 

© Save The River 2014