Issues

The St. Lawrence River is threatened by numerous problems. Read on to learn about a few key issues facing the St. Lawrence River ecosystem.

Invasive Species

Aquatic invasive species are one of the most critical problems facing the St. Lawrence River and Great Lakes. With 186 species introduced into the River and Lakes, the region's ecosystem is bending under the weight of these introduced species. Some scientists worry that the ecosystem of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River may be close to collapse because of these species.

To learn more about aquatic invasive species and Save The River's campaign to stop further introductions, visit our Clean Up the Ballast page.

Water Levels Regulation

With a massive hydropower dam blocking the River in the Massena/Cornwall region, water levels on the Upper St. Lawrence River are manually regulated. The management plan that has been in place for the past 50 years has caused significant damage to tens of thousands of acres of wetlands in the region.

To learn more about Save The River's campaign to restore more natural water levels on the River, visit our water levels page.

St. Lawrence Seaway

The St. Lawrence River is the only pathway for ships to enter the Great Lakes. Unfortunately, ships bring along a host of problems, from oils spills and accidents, to winter navigation damage, and constant threats to expand Seaway infrastructure. Save The River has been an advocate for more sustainable shipping on the River.

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To learn more about Save The River's shipping-related advocacy work, visit the following pages Spills/Accidents, Winter Navigation, Navigation Study, Clean Up the Ballast Campaign.

Latest News

Save The River in D.C., Urges Continued Levels of Funding for Great Lakes and River Restoration
Save The River traveled to Washington D.C. with other New York and Great Lake organizations as part of the Healing Our Waters Coalition to meet with elected representatives in an effort to secure sustained funding for improved water quality and programs protecting the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River. read more

Save The River Supports the Microbead-Free Waters Act
Save The River applauds Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman for reintroducing the Microbead-Free Waters Act again putting New York State in line to lead the effort to stop the use of microbeads in consumer products. read more

Its National Invasive Species Awareness Week
Last year New York State took a step forward to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species and to protect our waters. Beginning August 2015 all boats and floating docks launched in New York State must be clean of plant or animal matter. The intent of the new law is to prevent the spread of invasive species from one waterbody to another. read more

Cost of an Oil Spill Too High
The risk of an oil spill on the St. Lawrence River is an emerging threat as companies seek ways to transport the hug buildup of Bakken and tar sands oil. One oil tanker can carry the equivalent product of 225 rail cars or 870 trucks. If a ship carrying oil on the River was involved in an incident, a spill might not be the worse that could happen. In any case the end results would be devastating and the damage unimaginable. read more

Thousand Islands Regional Assessment-Report Now Available
For over a year a diverse group of area organizations, governments and citizens, Save The River among them, has worked to create the most comprehensive assessment of the Thousand Islands region that has been done to date. The draft report - the "Thousand Islands Regional Assessment" - is now complete and available for review by anyone interested. read more

Tell Governor Cuomo: SUPPORT FISHING ON THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER!
Plan 2014 is a modern water levels plan that will restore 64,000 acres of severely degraded wetlands. Restoring the vital functions they provide like critical fish habitat, and bolstering our recreation and tourism-based economy in the process. read more

Save The River’s Winter Conference Draws Record Attendance
“Save The River must engage on a wide range of issues because the St. Lawrence River is not an isolated waterbody, it is part of the largest freshwater system on earth”, said Mr. Willbanks. “In order for us to be effective we have formed partnerships with other organizations concerned with protecting freshwater. We are fortunate to be collaborating with agencies, and other not-for-profits and individuals throughout the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River region to deliver a strong message for swimmable, fishable, drinkable water.” read more

Can Alberta Sands oil be safely shipped on the St. Lawrence?
Only a few shipments of crude oil from Alberta Sands in Canada and the Bakken in North Dakota have come through the seaway, but environmentalists and state official are concerned more will come. read more

See our blog for more news!     


About Us

Founded in 1978, Save The River is a non-profit, member-supported environmental organization whose mission is to restore, preserve and protect the ecological integrity of the Upper St. Lawrence River through advocacy, education and research. Since 2004 Save The River has been a member of the Waterkeeper Alliance as the Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper.

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The River

The St. Lawrence River is one of the largest Rivers in the world and a magnificent place to live, work and play. Save The River has been working for more than 35 years to protect the River for current and future generations.

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Join or Give

Over half of Save The River's budget comes from individual memberships and contributions. Supporting us with an annual membership donation will keep our River advocacy, education and research programs going strong.

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Save The River was designated the Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper and is a member of the international Waterkeeper Alliance. The Waterkeeper Alliance is the world’s fastest growing environmental movement, with more than 200 local Waterkeepers patrolling rivers, lakes and coastal waterways on 6 continents.


Photos from around the River

Off to the races by Pam Quimby  Resting by Pam Quimby  On the Rocks by Nick Apel  Classic Sunset by Barb Hupp  TI Park Library by Meg Kerr  Fall by Carrie Kerr  Girls by Juliane Bauer  Winter Navigation by Sherman Ward  Off on the River by Jenni Werndorf  A Seaway View by Devon Colby 
 Pictures from our Flickr photostream

409 Riverside Drive
Clayton, NY 13624

(315) 686-2010
info@savetheriver.org

 

© Save The River 2014