Issues

The St. Lawrence River is threatened by numerous problems. Read on to learn about a few key issues facing the St. Lawrence River ecosystem.

Invasive Species

Aquatic invasive species are one of the most critical problems facing the St. Lawrence River and Great Lakes. With 186 species introduced into the River and Lakes, the region's ecosystem is bending under the weight of these introduced species. Some scientists worry that the ecosystem of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River may be close to collapse because of these species.

To learn more about aquatic invasive species and Save The River's campaign to stop further introductions, visit our Clean Up the Ballast page.

Water Levels Regulation

With a massive hydropower dam blocking the River in the Massena/Cornwall region, water levels on the Upper St. Lawrence River are manually regulated. The management plan that has been in place for the past 50 years has caused significant damage to tens of thousands of acres of wetlands in the region.

To learn more about Save The River's campaign to restore more natural water levels on the River, visit our water levels page.

St. Lawrence Seaway

The St. Lawrence River is the only pathway for ships to enter the Great Lakes. Unfortunately, ships bring along a host of problems, from oils spills and accidents, to winter navigation damage, and constant threats to expand Seaway infrastructure. Save The River has been an advocate for more sustainable shipping on the River.

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To learn more about Save The River's shipping-related advocacy work, visit the following pages Spills/Accidents, Winter Navigation, Navigation Study, Clean Up the Ballast Campaign.

Latest News

Senate Protects St. Lawrence River & Great Lakes
Last Wednesday, after a tremendous outpouring of opposition led by Save The River members and many others across the Great Lakes / St. Lawrence region, the U.S. Senate voted to protect the St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes by defeating the Vessel Incidental Discharge Act. read more

Clean Water Safeguards Eliminated in Must-Pass Budget Bills
Call your Congressperson and ask them to reject all policy riders attacking safeguards for the St. Lawrence River and all streams, wetlands, lakes, rivers, and other waters that our families, communities, and economy depend on. read more

Director’s Waypoints, Winter Conference Edition
Links to videos of the presentations and question and answer sessions, plus more noteworthy news. read more

Thank You!
Watertown Daily Times editorial makes the point. Breaking ice to get ships to locks they can't get through once they're there just doesn't make sense. read more

Seaway Closing Update
We look forward to the opportunity for a discussion of the time and manner of selecting and modifying the opening and closing dates of the Seaway. Particularly in light of increasing variability in weather on the Lake and River. read more

Federal Biscay Now Freed from Snell Lock
An update will be issued when the five ships awaiting transit downbound have exited the Upper River. read more

With Ship Still Stuck, Silence from the Seaway – Updated
The Federal Biscay is still stuck in a lock on the Seaway, with four ships waiting behind it and no one is talking about what is being done to get things moving. read more

Another Incident on the Seaway – Updated
The Seaway has issued a statement on the ship stuck in the Snell Lock. read more

Latest update on the Pacific Huron from the U.S. Coast Guard
The Pacific Huron is off the shoal and is at anchor for further inspection. No discharges to the River reported. read more

Ship Aground off Blind Bay – Updated
Updated with press releases from the Seaway and the Coast Guard read more

See our blog for more news!     


About Us

Founded in 1978, Save The River is a non-profit, member-supported environmental organization whose mission is to restore, preserve and protect the ecological integrity of the Upper St. Lawrence River through advocacy, education and research. Since 2004 Save The River has been a member of the Waterkeeper Alliance as the Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper.

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The River

The St. Lawrence River is one of the largest Rivers in the world and a magnificent place to live, work and play. Save The River has been working for more than 35 years to protect the River for current and future generations.

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Join or Give

Over half of Save The River's budget comes from individual memberships and contributions. Supporting us with an annual membership donation will keep our River advocacy, education and research programs going strong.

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Save The River was designated the Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper and is a member of the international Waterkeeper Alliance. The Waterkeeper Alliance is the world’s fastest growing environmental movement, with more than 200 local Waterkeepers patrolling rivers, lakes and coastal waterways on 6 continents.


Photos from around the River

Off to the races by Pam Quimby  Resting by Pam Quimby  On the Rocks by Nick Apel  Classic Sunset by Barb Hupp  TI Park Library by Meg Kerr  Fall by Carrie Kerr  Girls by Juliane Bauer  Winter Navigation by Sherman Ward  Off on the River by Jenni Werndorf  A Seaway View by Devon Colby 
 Pictures from our Flickr photostream

409 Riverside Drive
Clayton, NY 13624

(315) 686-2010
info@savetheriver.org

 

© Save The River 2014